The Poor Investor – Investigatory Value Investing

"Faber est suae quisque fortunae" -Appius Claudius Caecus

Tag Archives: Apple

Who You Know or What You Know?

I’ve recently finished my MBA and am now searching for employment opportunities. In this search I’m reminded, quite starkly, of the oft-quoted phrase, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” The great thing about the stock market is that it works in exactly the opposite way. In the stock market, it’s not who you know that matters but what you know. The market, as Ken Fisher puts it, is “The Great Humiliator” and does not care who you are or who you know, “it wants to humiliate everyone.” In fact, who you know often works against you and may even entice investors towards illegal activities, as exemplified recently by a few well-known individuals.

The “what you know” I’m referring to here is your own analysis of individual companies and the markets in general. In fact, if you would have listened to common wisdom (the “who”) you might have sold in May, went away and missed out on a 2.1% gain in the S&P 500. You might have missed the boat on Apple at around $427 a share when everyone was claiming the sky was falling only to watch it rise to $633 a share, a lost opportunity of $206 per share. Once, when I was new to investing, I told a friend not to invest in Sirius XM when it was trading around $0.30 per share and he missed out on a potential 10-bagger. Or, you might have listened to friends who told you to buy Facebook when it first went public at $38 per share only to watch it drop to $18 in the first three months.

Nothing works better in investing than coming up with your own conclusions. For one, you won’t have the conviction in the company you are buying if you go based off of someone else’s recommendation. Even if someone is spot on about a company’s valuation and tells you that company X will go from $5 a share to $15 a share—even if this person is absolutely right and has a compelling enough reason— are you going to be able to hold the company’s stock when it goes from $5 a share to $1 a share before it goes up to $15 a share? Will you really have that level of discipline and, more importantly, trust in someone else’s judgment? Only by doing your own analysis, coming up with your own valuation and buying a company that you have strong conviction in because you put in the hard work will you be able to hold through the downs (or buy more) and not sell too early during the ups. This person’s recommendation may be 100% accurate but you might be enticed to sell at $7 for a $2 gain because you just won’t have the commitment you would have had if you came up with the idea in the first place.

Secondly, if your investment is in a company someone else recommends, you probably won’t have any idea of what to look for when things are going south. Are insiders selling? Did a member of management leave? Is this good or bad? How do you know if you didn’t investigate the company thoroughly? Now, say, the company has to raise funds by issuing stock— is this good? Was this part of the company’s plan all along? If you weren’t following the company, if you didn’t do your homework, you wouldn’t have any idea on these questions or any others. There won’t be any tip-offs to tell you when things are going well or if the management is running the company into the ground when you don’t put in the long hours of work it takes to investigate a company thoroughly enough to have conviction in it.

These are just a few of the reasons why you need to think for yourself when it comes to investing. This is why I don’t like recommending companies, it takes away from a core part of what will make someone a successful investor. I like to use companies as examples to illustrate ideas and how to think about companies, not as advice for what to buy. And with that, I will leave you with a quote from the Oracle of Omaha himself:

“You have to think for yourself. It always amazes me how high-IQ people mindlessly imitate. I never get good ideas talking to other people.”  -Warren Buffett

Track Record is Everything

In a book by Peter Krass called The Book of Investing Wisdom, there is an essay by Warren Buffett entitled Track Record is Everything.  The crux of this essay is that past performance history, aka track record, is one of the best single guides as far as judging businesses and investments go.  With that in mind, I thought it’d be useful to show readers of this website what my track record has been thus far for recommendations made on this site.  This should help new readers judge whether the information they obtain from this site is useful.  Though, I should note, as most of my regular readers know, I do not often mention stock “picks.”  However, I do recommend some stocks from time to time to help illuminate some idea or point out glaring inefficiencies in the market (see my post on Apple).  Although, these recommendations come with the caveat that every investor should do his or her own research before coming to a conclusion.

So, let’s get right down to it.  Here is how my “picks” have performed:

Stocks Recommended Recommended
Date Symbol PPS at Date Current PPS Sell PPS Sell Date % Change
9/13/12 dell $10.63 N/A $13.85 2/24/13 30.29%
9/13/12 nvda $13.68 $15.21 N/A N/A 11.18%
9/13/12 atri $218.87 $269.40 N/A N/A 23.09%
3/11/13 aapl $431.72 $515.00 N/A N/A 19.29%
4/22/13 ntcxf $0.81 $1.07 N/A N/A 32.10%
Average= 23.19%
S&P Return (since 9/13/12)= 22.01%
Difference= 1.18%

So far, my “picks” have out-performed the S&P 500 by 1.18% (used the first pick start date for simplification purposes).  Only one sell recommendation, Dell, was given so far.  Now, as Warren Buffett clearly notes in his essay, a 5 – 10 year track record is much more important in making judgments.  However, this site has not been around that long to establish such a track record.   At that time, I will revisit this topic.

Apple’s Stock and the Voting Machine

Peter Lynch put it quite simply by saying, “Buy what you know.”  Now, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that there was a study showing this often does not work.  Here, however, it does.

The other day I walked into an Apple store to check out the iPad mini.  It was like walking into a swarm of bees in a beehive.  People were everywhere.  Everyone I know loves Apple’s products and owns at least 1 apple device.  Those I know who don’t own an Apple device plan on buying one in the near future.  I’ve used other products, talked to others who use other products, and everyone admits these devices aren’t as good as Apple devices, this includes: phones, computers, MP3 players, portable tablets, etc.  Apple products are vastly superior in every category, there’s really no debate.  The only reason you wouldn’t buy an Apple product is because you were interested in saving money, with plans to purchase one in the future when the price goes down.

As for the current state of Apple’s stock, Peter Lynch has something else to say about that:

“When even the analysts are bored, it’s time to start buying.”

There’s no question that analysts are bored with Apple, but, really, who cares?  Apple’s stock is a no-brainer at $431.72 as I type right now, March 10, 2013.  The company has $137b in cash.  With that amount of cash Apple could buy Ford and Honda and almost have enough money left over to buy Tata Motors at the companies’ current market valuations.  This is an insane amount of cash for one company.  If Apple has any problem, it’s having too much cash, not the worst problem a company could have.  Personally, I think Apple should follow in the footsteps of IBM and buy a massive amount of its own shares.  Its current share buyback program only allots $10b for this endeavor.  With $137b in cash, that is chump change.

Apple, according to a recent press release, plans on returning a lot of that cash to its shareholders:

“Apple’s management team and Board of Directors have been in active discussions about returning additional cash to shareholders. As part of our review, we will thoroughly evaluate Greenlight Capital’s current proposal to issue some form of preferred stock. We welcome Greenlight’s views and the views of all of our shareholders.”

Cash considerations aside, Apple trades at a current P/E of 9.79.  This is well below the 5-yr. average P/E of 15.6.  Furthermore, Apple’s P/E has never been so far removed from the S&P 500′s P/E as it is now, trading at ~40% below the S&P 500′s (~43% below the Nasdaq’s), with Apple’s average P/E being 64% above the S&P 500′s since 2003.

If the P/E is any indication of investors’ expectation, they don’t seem to believe that Apple will grow much faster than ~10% per year.  However, over the last 5 years Apple has increased earnings by an average of 63% per year.  If Apple continues growing at even half that rate, you’d be looking at EPS of ~$174 by 2017.  This would equate to a share price of $1703.46 at the current P/E.  Now, I must reiterate, this is the half-growth scenario.  Staying at the average current growth rate would mean a share price of $4973.32.  Now, my hypothesis is that we land somewhere towards the lower end near $1703, taking into consideration that the market discounts the future and that the company is not going to realistically grow into being 20% of our economy— but this would still amount to almost a 4-fold gain in under 4 years.  Furthermore, either way growth pans out, you’re looking at what could be over a trillion dollar company sometime in the 2014-2015 range.

With growth and P/E considerations in mind, read these quotes by famous P/E investor John Neff:

“Low p/e multiples usually languished 40 percent to 60 percent below prevailing market multiples.”

“Low p/e companies growing faster than 7 percent a year tipped us off to underappreciated signs of life, particularly accompanied by an attention getting dividend yield.”

As shown earlier, the p/e multiple does languish more than 40% below prevailing market multiples.  Also, Apple is growing much faster than 7 percent with a pretty astonishing dividend, for what I still deem a “growth company,” of 2.46%.

Peter Lynch would love this stock, especially when looking at the P/E in terms of the growth.  While Yahoo gives a PEG of 0.5, Peter Lynch looks at it a slightly different way.  He takes the long-term growth rate, which I estimate on the low side to be 30% (Yahoo’s estimate is 20%), adds the dividend yield, 2.46%, and divides by the P/E ratio, 9.79.  This gives 3.3 for my estimate vs. 2.3 for Yahoo’s.  In One Up on Wall Street Lynch describes the interpretation of these values as the following:

 “Less than a 1 is poor, and 1.5 is okay, but what you’re really looking for is a 2 or better.”

He goes on to give an example of a stock that scores a “3″ and deems it “fabulous.”  If we say that the number will most likely fall somewhere between these two estimates, 2.3-3.3, we’re looking at a stock Peter Lynch would undoubtedly rate as a “strong buy.”

Now, there are concerns that Apple’s moat may be drying up as companies like Google continue to steal market share.  However, in this analysis a margin of safety was added by considering Apple’s stock in light of growth drying up 50%, which isn’t likely to happen.  You have the new Macbook Air coming out, iPad 5, iPad mini 2, iPhone 5s, iMac, Mac mini, just to name a few.  And according to CEO Tim Cook, new products in new categories are on the horizon.  Some anticipate the iWatch as one.  The bottom line: it doesn’t matter what is on the horizon.  Apple could make a car and people would buy it just because it is an Apple product.  Even if Apple didn’t come out with any new products, looking at the company from a zero growth perspective, seen here (provided by Old School Value) for those interested in more advanced valuation methods, Apple’s stock has significant downside protection.

As was said by many great value investors, “Protect the downside and the upside will take care of itself.”

Let’s forget the growth concern altogether. A huge aspect not talked about very often is the strong IP position Apple has, illuminated below, from this article:

“…Apple is falling back on its IP portfolio to protect its market position. Generating revenue by suing other companies is not the ultimate goal of Apple’s recent lawsuits. Rather, each case that Apple wins confirms the validity and enforceability of its patents to its competitors. Apple can then license its patented technologies and designs and charge Google and other competitors for using them, piggybacking on their competitors’ success.

It would appear that Apple’s business model is evolving into two modes. First, use a closed model to develop innovative technologies for sophisticated user markets; patent the utilities and designs that the company engineers. Second, license those utilities and designs to businesses that wish to use them. So long as Apple continues to be the first of its competitors to patent new technologies, combining both modes would create serious revenue for Apple and help it maintain its leadership position.”

So… to reiterate the absolute absurdness of this price and to lighten things up a bit, watch this video of Bill Maher and his guests talking about Apple:

And although this video is older, I still find it extremely relevant to this post:

As Ben Graham famously said, “In the short term, the stock market behaves like a voting machine, but in the long term it acts like a weighing machine.”  Long-term shareholders that buy Apple at this price can take advantage of this phenomenon.

Disclosure: Long AAPL

Bull Markets, Mega Caps, and College Campuses

Sir John Templeton famously said, “Bull-markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism and die on euphoria.” As we know right now, we are still no where near the “euphoria” stage, even though the markets have had an impressive run, with the S&P 500 alone up 15% YTD.

I would like to share a video with you from Davis Advisors that I think is helpful during this time. This may not be new information, but I think it’s good to have a refresher every so often, think of it as mental flossing:

Davis Funds: Insights

Also, according to Ken Fisher’s research, this “phase” of a bull market is usually best for mega-cap stocks. To his point, I do see value in companies such as Apple, Berkshire Hathaway, Eli Lilly, Sanofi, Proctor & Gamble, and Kimberly-Clark, to name a few.

I would also like to reiterate my “buy” recommendation on Heska (pick removed due to new information: 01/03/2013), Dell, Nvidia, and Atrion. Dell has been particularly attractive as of late as it hit a new 52-week low which it has since bounced off of quite nicely. I hope you took advantage, as my readers, and picked up shares along with me.

I would also like to add one more recommendation: American Campus Communities. Ron Baron explains the moat:

“There are five million obsolete college campus housing units that need to be replaced and renovated. Colleges can’t afford to do this. That’s the growth opportunity. American Campus is the largest provider of such housing with nearly 70,000 units. It builds and owns housing on college campuses with 80 year land leases that prevent others from competing against them.”

Not to mention, the company has an 11% profit margin and a 3% dividend. Also, as housing comes back, this stock will rise with the tide. Revenue and operating cash flow have steadily increased over the past 10 years (10-year average for revenue: 25.35%) while operating margins have remained near 18-25% during this time. With a moat firmly in place, I see no reason for this not to continue.

What I would not be holding now: bonds, gold, cash.

Disclosure: Long DELL & NVDA

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 51 other followers

%d bloggers like this: